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fstw:

shoutout to my mutuals that I don’t really talk to y’all still cool

(via desert-gurl)

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gradientlair:

I follow @KristyT on Twitter and she let me know about a project that she created with @tiffani (#DetroitWater) to help Detroit residents with their water costs. Their website is detroitwaterproject.org and there you can confidentially donate to cover a person’s bill. 
Detroit has the highest percentage of Black residents compared to any other major U.S. city, and as I wrote about in Black In The 99%, race is most certainly forever intertwined with class and poverty; these cannot be extracted from each other, especially in a country where its very financial system and imperialistic power would not exist without enslavement and genocide. There is no way to extract the economic violence being committed upon Detroit residents from racial histories. 
According to RH Reality Check, "in Detroit, the cost of water is nearly twice the national average, and approximately half of the city’s customers owe outstanding balances on their water bills. But let’s situate this against a broader historical and sociopolitical backdrop. By 2011, half of Detroit’s working-age population was unemployed, and only 27 percent had full-time work. Nearly one in five Detroit residents were below the poverty line. Approximately three in five children were living in households headed by single mothers (see Rose Brewer’s article on the prison industrial complex). Moreover, these statistics are significantly worse for the city’s Black and Latino residents.” 
People simply cannot go without water and while this entire situation is larger than just “unpaid bills” but are acts of violence against these residents amidst larger economic and racial disenfranchisement, with the recent 15 day suspension on the human-made drought, hopefully no other excuses can be used to harm these people if they’re able to pay the bills. This isn’t about lack of “personal responsibility” creating negligence over a “luxury” but about systemic poverty, capitalism, privatization and WATER. 
Again, if you want to support Detroit residents through a confidential donation via this fundraiser created by two thoughtful Black women, visit: detroitwaterproject.org.

gradientlair:

I follow @KristyT on Twitter and she let me know about a project that she created with @tiffani (#DetroitWater) to help Detroit residents with their water costs. Their website is detroitwaterproject.org and there you can confidentially donate to cover a person’s bill. 

Detroit has the highest percentage of Black residents compared to any other major U.S. city, and as I wrote about in Black In The 99%, race is most certainly forever intertwined with class and poverty; these cannot be extracted from each other, especially in a country where its very financial system and imperialistic power would not exist without enslavement and genocide. There is no way to extract the economic violence being committed upon Detroit residents from racial histories. 

According to RH Reality Check, "in Detroit, the cost of water is nearly twice the national average, and approximately half of the city’s customers owe outstanding balances on their water bills. But let’s situate this against a broader historical and sociopolitical backdrop. By 2011, half of Detroit’s working-age population was unemployed, and only 27 percent had full-time work. Nearly one in five Detroit residents were below the poverty line. Approximately three in five children were living in households headed by single mothers (see Rose Brewer’s article on the prison industrial complex). Moreover, these statistics are significantly worse for the city’s Black and Latino residents.” 

People simply cannot go without water and while this entire situation is larger than just “unpaid bills” but are acts of violence against these residents amidst larger economic and racial disenfranchisement, with the recent 15 day suspension on the human-made drought, hopefully no other excuses can be used to harm these people if they’re able to pay the bills. This isn’t about lack of “personal responsibility” creating negligence over a “luxury” but about systemic poverty, capitalism, privatization and WATER. 

Again, if you want to support Detroit residents through a confidential donation via this fundraiser created by two thoughtful Black women, visit: detroitwaterproject.org.

(via blood-and-vitriol)

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kiriamaya:

Explaining your mental illness to others is a tough balancing act. You want them to believe you, but you also don’t want them to start treating you as subhuman because of it.

I wish it didn’t have to be like that.

Always interesting to see which posts of mine blow up. I have to admit, I never expected this one to; it was just an off-the-cuff vent.

I guess it’s one that lots of people identify with. And that, to me, is really sad. :( And it’s something that needs to change.

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A bit of advice for friends of depressed/anxious/etc. people (not just me, but anyone):

Sometimes, what we need is to be talked through a situation. Not berated, or told to cheer up, or told it’s “not that bad”… but to be helped through some of the practical considerations that may not always be obvious when we’re freaking out or self-hating.

For example, a friend just helped remind me that I could make oatmeal. When I was freaking out at her about how I didn’t have anything I could eat right away, she helped me go through a list of what I had, and figure out what I could cook at my current spoon level. As a result, I was able to eat and feel a little better.

Another example: Some of you remember how, way back in May 2011, I finally reached the transition-or-die breaking point, which physically manifested as me freezing/trembling in the middle of class in front of everybody. I was fortunate, then, to have a school instructor who helped talk me through the situation and who helped create the beginnings of a plan of action for coming out at school. This then snowballed into coming out at work and getting my name change process started, and I’ve been living as my lady self “full-time” ever since.

Notice how there was no minimizing of the situation, no attempts to tell me that I was “blowing things out of proportion” or whatever. It was more, “Okay, let’s look at the practical situation, and see what we can do.” That sort of help can be invaluable to a person as anxiety-prone/depression-prone as I am.

Tags: food tag
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bemusedlybespectacled:

princess-neville:

girls being kept out of the sciences and pushed into the humanities; the humanities being valued less in our society than the sciences; and the humanities and sciences being looked at as stark opposites that couldn’t possibly be enjoyed for the same reasons are all problems that need to in some degree be tackled together 

FUN HISTORY FACT

it used to be that the arts and humanities (at least in western cultures) were GIRLY THINGS FOR GIRLS, but at one point they started being masculinized so like poets would say that apollo was inspiring them or whatever instead of, you know, the all-female muses

MEANWHILE AT THE SAME TIME

science was always considered a masculine art, but the “scientific muse” became a woman around the time the lit muse became a man

and then it reversed again after women started doing things like hosting scientific salons and shit

science and the humanities have always been gendered, what gender they are has changed over time

and it’s always been weighted in favor of what men are thought to be best at at the time

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barbieprivilege:

honestly i applaud all girls who tell gross strange men to f*ck off but dnt feel ashamed if u can’t bring yourself to bc basically you’re taking the chance of “this guy might stab me for this” which is fairly plausible given history + Power dynamics so, like, dnt turn ur nose ^^^ at ppl who have a harder time with that

(via xdominoe)

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lotuslopez:

"not everyone has to be included all the time" says the person who is always included

(via variousawesomereblogs)

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Reblog if ur gay and Capitalism needs to go

(Source: ghostqunk, via cishaming)

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folkmessiah:

getting spoken to as if i’m straight by straight people who assume everyone is straight, subsequently feeling like the world’s most useless and irritated secret agent

(via telegantmess)

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gradientlair:

janetmock:

Three years ago, I first told my story in Marie Claire. Today, I am proud to announce that I am joining the magazine’s editorial team as a Contributing Editor. In my role, I will write for the print and online versions of the magazine, act as a brand ambassador and contribute insight and ideas about culture and beauty, politics and pop culture.

Congrats. ❤ 

EEEEE

gradientlair:

janetmock:

Three years ago, I first told my story in Marie Claire. Today, I am proud to announce that I am joining the magazine’s editorial team as a Contributing Editor. In my role, I will write for the print and online versions of the magazine, act as a brand ambassador and contribute insight and ideas about culture and beauty, politics and pop culture.

Congrats.  

EEEEE

(via strugglingtobeheard)